Thursday, January 10, 2013

Ron Silliman

If I wrote one of a zillion screenplays and there was a film made with the title Silliman, I'd hope to have Philip Seymour Hoffman play the lead:




9 comments:

Adam Fieled said...

Forget it. Seymour-Hoffman is 6'3 and Silliman is 5'3. I've met both.

Steve said...

Hiya Adam, and LOL, :)

Well, okay, I’ve never met Seymour-Hoffman (surely one of HIS, as well as my own, generation’s very finest actors, hands down and both thumbs up), although he grew up in Fairport, New York, which is 8 miles from where I live (Palmyra, New York) and 18 miles from where I grew up, but I meant that seriously. As you know, Truman Capote was IN FACT 5'3 and Seymour-Hoffman played Capote majestically. Silliman’s stature (in Letters) is 10 miles taller than Capote’s (the latter, of course, being thoroughly “commercial” and “bourgeois” in comparison), and R.S. is of course, as you well know, about 5'9 (or at least he was when I first met him in 1985 or thereabouts, following a reading at Canessa Park in downtown SF, I think it was). But it’s Hoffman’s comportment that would be best suited to playing Silliman, as both carry themselves with a certain integrity and dignity that we all respect eternally. The real point of my post, though, is that I despair that I will never complete ANY of the “screen plays” that constantly egg me on through mid-life, but if I, or someone else, maybe an alias or an ally or a detractor, ever wrote one that had a “Silliman” character, YEAH, how about Seymour-Hoffman for the role, and why not? I think that he’d be a great match! (For that matter, why not write a screenplay that depicted Seymour-Hoffman playing Ron? Again, just one of zillions of thots, sad to report).

Stephen Baraban said...

The poetry movie I've dreamed of for a long time is "Ez, Hilda, and Bill". It would show Pound, Doolittle, and Pound frolicking in their Pennnsylvania college years, then cross-cut between their three lives thereafter.

Steve said...

Bromige told me a story that one time Pound lost his apartment after the landlord found out that he had sheltered some woman for an overnight or something. (The gist of it was that Pound had been compassionate, NOT sexual, but the times were so Victorian and repressive and all.) Yeah, they first knew each other as college buds, huh. Bromige also said that Pound came to Williams' house and met his family or something to that effect.

But how about YOUR screenplay of the three? Would it be Hollywoodish, Realistic, more Lit than Theatre, Quite Inventive, a Period Piece, a Satire? Tell me more, SB! :)

Steve said...

Of course, I may be bringing up these foggy memories from the Kenner book THE POUND ERA, one that Bromige had surely read through a few times and could/would draw from, whereas my copy still sits on a dusty shelf, partially-read, and not thoroughly skimmed, but maybe it give it a look-see again now that you've spurred me on, Stephen.

(Maybe... It's like "football." I loved PLAYING IT in high school. After high school, I never enjoyed WATCHING IT. I.e., Reading about what THEY DID is not always as urgent as participating with what WE ARE DOING TODAY, you and I right this moment, for example. :)

Stephen Baraban said...

Steve,

Pound & his entertaining/sheltering of women: yes, that was when he was teaching Romance Languages at a conservative college in Indiana in 1907--and he lost his teaching job for it, as well as getting in trouble with landlords/landladies.

Steve said...

In INDIANA, Yes, that's why in my head everytime I thought about that I "pictured" "it" "on a map over in the north mid-west" (the way my mind "remembers" places, sometimes, as points on maps, very visual, I guess).

Thanks, Stephen, good for us to do, this kind of thing, and keep our memories sharp as best we can... Again, got it from Bromige, probably while taking "Moderns" class in 1984, my first class with him (and when I got turneed to on American Poetry 20th Century, by David).
:)

Stephen Baraban said...

Steve, the first part of the Pound/H.D./Williams movie I envision would be a lot like early scenes from Truffaut's "Jules and Jim" wherein the three high-spirited young people experience joyful times and form their tight bond. Pound and Williams did go in for collegiate fencing, so it would be fun to intercut a clip from the Truffaut flick of Jules and Jim practicing that sport in their gym. The rest of the movie would be VERY hard to create coherently and interestingly, the more I think about it, because the three poets went on to have such very complicated individual lives, basically separate from each other. Maybe only a very allusive, fragmentary, back-and-forth in time avant garde extravaganza like Todd Haynes' BobDylan bioflic "I'm Not There" would work aesthetically. I guess that will get financing when "Ron Silliman" does :)

Steve said...

You and I REALLY SHOULD BE writing these things, "screenplays," like what our hearts/minds/IMAGINATIONS beckon us for, regardless that they would ever be "filmable." I have a feeling that both of us do a good deal of our "dreaming" in "FILM STYLE" and why limit our writing to "poetry," Poetry," "poming," "screen writing," or any other kind of preformed literary form... Great stuff in your last note. Will add to this later this afternoon. :)